Jul 25

Heatwave breaks with thunderstorms – Met Office

Very hot conditions will continue across central, eastern and southeastern parts of the England until the end of the week, but the heat will trigger intense thunderstorms in some areas.

The heatwave of 2018 will reach a peak for the time being on Thursday and Friday with temperatures likely to break the UK July record, and possibly the all-time UK record somewhere in southeast England. Highs of 35 °C are expected on Thursday and 37 °C on Friday.

Paul Gundersen, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office, said: “The heatwave conditions will continue across much of England, with temperatures into the mid to high 30s Celsius in many places from the Midlands eastwards on Thursday and Friday and it’s possible that we could break the all-time UK record of 38.5° C if conditions all come together.

“If you’re looking for somewhere to escape the heat, western and northern areas will have pleasantly warm mid 20s Celsius, although across Northern Ireland and western Scotland this may be accompanied by occasionally cloudy skies.”

The highest temperature recorded so far this year is 33.3 °C at Santon Downham on 23 July. The highest temperature recorded in 2017 was 34.5° C at Heathrow on 21st June. Prior to this, the most recent heatwave prior to this was in July 2015 when temperatures peaked at 36.7 °C at Heathrow on 1 July, a temperature that is currently the July all-time maximum record. The all-time record in the UK is 38.5° C at Faversham on 10 August 2003.

The dry spell has been most prolonged in East Anglia and Southeast England. Most especially much of East Anglia and Cambridgeshire, extending through Essex into London and also around Bournemouth and Southampton.  Parts of the Midlands have also been very dry. The last day of very widespread rainfall for East Anglia and the south-east was 29 May.

The hot and sunny weather is an opportunity for many to enjoy the outdoors, especially during the school holidays.  Amanda Bond from Visit Suffolk said: “With Suffolk having seen some of the highest temperatures this week and with the sunshine set to continue, this gives visitors the perfect excuse to get outdoors and experience what the county has to offer.

“Suffolk is known for its natural beauty, 50 miles of glorious coastline and charming villages and historic towns. Now the schools are out for summer there are many ways to occupy the kids with our fun-filled family visitor attractions such as Africa Alive!, Southwold Pier, West Stow Anglo Saxon Village, RSPB Minsmere and Kentwell Hall, to name a few. Although, sometimes, in a place this rich and beautiful, just being is pleasure enough.”   For more information, visit www.visitsuffolk.com.

Hot weather often brings the risk of showers and thunderstorms and there is a chance of a few of these breaking out over East Anglia, southeast and perhaps central England on Thursday evening. It is Friday when we expect the highest chance of intense thunderstorms across eastern parts of England on Friday before the fresher, conditions finally make their way east across the UK for the weekend.

Gundersen added: “There is the chance of thunderstorms breaking out over some eastern parts of England on Thursday, but it is Friday when we see intense thunderstorms affecting many central and eastern areas.

“Whilst many places will remain dry and hot, the thunderstorms on Friday could lead to torrential downpours in places with a much as 30 mm of rainfall in an hour and 60 mm in 3 hours. Large hail and strong, gusty winds are also likely and combined could lead to difficult driving conditions as a result of spray and sudden flooding. We have issued a Met Office weather warning highlighting the areas most at risk”

A Level 3 heat-health watch warning has been issued for a large part of England, in association with Public Health England. The Heat Health Watch Service is designed to help healthcare professionals manage through periods of extreme temperature.

Hot weather, especially when prolonged, with warm nights, can have effects on people’s health and on certain infrastructure. To aid preparation and awareness before and during a prolonged hot spell, a heatwave plan has been created by Public Health England in association with the Met Office and other partners. It recommends a series of steps to reduce the risks to health from prolonged exposure to severe heat for:

  • The NHS, local authorities, social care, and other public agencies
  • Professionals working with people at risk
  • Individuals, local communities and voluntary groups

Dr Thomas Waite, Consultant in Health Protection at Public Health England, said: “Temperatures are likely be high in parts of England this week, which may leave older people, young children and those with long-term conditions, including heart and lung diseases, struggling to adapt to the heat. So keep an eye on friends and family who may be at risk.

“To beat the heat, try to keep out the sun from 11am to 3pm, walk in the shade if you can, apply sunscreen and wear a hat if you have to go out in the heat. Also try to carry water with you when travelling.”

Aug 02

The hottest July for at least the last 30 years in Cyprus

July 2017: the hottest July for at least the last 30 years

In July 2017 extremely high temperatures were recorded all over Cyprus. Specifically, the mean provisional daily maximum temperatures of Athalassa, Prodromos, Pafos Airport, Larnaka Airport and Paralimni are a record of high temperatures of July and rank July 2017 as the hottest for at least the last 30 years.

The table of “Ranking of Mean Daily Maximum Temperature for July” and the chart of Mean Daily Maximum, Minimum and Mean Temperature for the station of Athalassa for the period 1983-2017, are presented below.

Ranking of Mean Daily Maximum Temperature
Polis Chrysochous
Pafos A/P
Prodromos
Troodos
Lemesos
Athalassa R/S
Larnaka A/PParalimni
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean DailyYearMean Daily
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp Max Temp
1
2016
35.4
2017
32.2
2017
31.3
2000
28.4
2012
35.2
2017
39.3
2017
34.6201736.5
2
1998
34.6
2012
31.8
2000
31.2
2017
28.2
2007
35.1
2000
39.1
2012
34.2201235.8
3
1968
34.5
2007
31.6
2001
30.1
2001
26.8
2011
34.6
2012
38.2
2000
34.1200835.3
4
1977
34.4
2016
31.5
2008
29.6
1998
26.6
2017
34.6
1998
38.2
2003
34.0201335.3
5
1988
34.3
1988
31.4
2011
29.6
1996
26.6
2000
34.5
2008
38.2
1978
33.9201635.3
6
2008
34.3
2002
31.2
2007
29.2
2007
26.6
1988
34.4
2007
38.2
2007
33.8201135.1
7
2007
34.2
2008
31.0
1980
29.1
2012
26.3
2015
34.2
1988
38.1
1988
33.8200035.0
8
1995
34.1
2000
30.9
2016
29.1
1980
26.3
2002
34.2
2016
38.0
2009
33.7200234.8
9
2017
34.1
2009
30.9
1996
29.0
2011
26.2
2004
34.1
2004
38.0
2004
33.6200734.8
10
1978
34.1
2011
30.8
2004
29.0
2004
26.1
2016
34.1
2003
37.7
2016
33.6200334.4
Feb 22

Heat Wave Breaks Records in Australia

NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using data from the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC). Caption by Adam Voiland.

Heat waves are not unusual in Australia. A subtropical belt of high pressure that flows over the continent regularly delivers pulses of hot, dry air to the surface in the summer. Yet even by Australian standards, the intense heat wave of February 2017 has been remarkable.

When a high-pressure system stalled over central Australia, extreme temperatures emerged first in South Australia and Victoria and then spread to New South Wales, Queensland, and Northern Territory. With overheated bats dropping from trees and bushfires burning out of control, temperatures smashed records in many areas.

This map shows peak land surface temperatures between February 7 and 14, 2017, a period when some of the most extreme heating occurred. The map is based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. Note that it depicts land surface temperatures, not air temperatures. Land surface temperatures reflect how hot the surface of the Earth would feel to the touch in a particular location. They can sometimes be significantly hotter or cooler than air temperatures. (To learn more about LSTs and air temperatures, read: Where is the Hottest Place on Earth?)

On February 12, 2017, air temperatures rose to 46.6°C (115.9°F) in the coastal city of Port Macquarie, New South Wales, breaking the city’s all-time record by 3.3 degrees Celsius (5.9 degrees Fahrenheit). Two days earlier, the average maximum temperature across all of New South Wales hit a record-setting 42.4°C (108.3°F)—a record that was broken the next day when it rose to 44.0°C (111.2°F).

In some places, the duration of the heatwave has been noteworthy. Mungindi, a town on the border of Queensland and New South Wales, endured 52 days in a row when maximum temperatures exceeded 35°C (95°F)—a record for New South Wales.

Many scientists see exceptional heat waves like this as part of a broader trend. For instance, one study published by the Climate Council of Australia concluded that heatwaves—defined as at least three days of unusually high temperatures—grew significantly longer, more intense, and frequent between 1971 and 2008.