Sep 19

MARIA BECOMES A POTENTIALLY CATASTROPHIC CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE…THE EYE AND THE INTENSE INNER CORE IS NEARING DOMINICA

Hurricane Maria is centered as of 8 p.m. AST about 15 miles (25 km) east-southeast of Dominica and about 40 miles (70 km) north of Martinique. Maria is moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 km/h), and this general motion is expected to continue through Wednesday. On the forecast track, the core of Maria will move near Dominica and the adjacent Leeward Islands during the next few hours, over the extreme northeastern Caribbean Sea the remainder of tonight and Tuesday, and approach Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands Tuesday night and Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 160 mph (260 km/h) with higher gusts -a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some additional strengthening is possible tonight, but some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or two. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km). The estimated minimum central pressure based on Air Force Hurricane Hunter data is 925 mb (27.32 inches).

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts, Nevis, and Montserrat, U.S. Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Culebra, and Vieques. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion. Hurricane conditions should be spreading across Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Martinique during the next few hours, with tropical storm conditions already occurring over portions of the Leeward Islands. Hurricane conditions should spread through the remainder of the hurricane warning area tonight through Wednesday. Interests elsewhere in Hispaniola should monitor the progress of this system. Additional watches and warnings may be required later tonight or on Tuesday.

Sep 11

JOSE PASSING WELL NORTHEAST OF THE TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

Hurricane Jose is centered at 11 a.m. AST about 305 miles (490 km) north-northeast of Grand Turk Island. Jose is moving toward the north near 9 mph (15 km/h). A turn toward the northeast is expected tonight, followed by a slower motion toward the southeast Tuesday and Tuesday night. Maximum sustained winds are near 105 mph (165 km/h) with higher gusts. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km). The estimated minimum central pressure is 968 mb (28.59 inches).

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect. Swells generated by Jose will affect portions of Hispaniola, the Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands over the next couple of days. These swells are likely to produce high surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office – www.weather.gov

Nov 25

ATLANTIC OCEAN * Full Update* NASA Sees Hurricane Otto’s Landfall and Exit from Nicaragua

15170886_1237223252991132_5311537646400926911_n

Hurricane Otto made landfall in southern Nicaragua on Thursday, Nov. 24 with maximum sustained winds near 110 mph (175 kph) as a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. A NASA animation of NOAA’s GOES satellite imagery captured the movement and landfall of this late-season storm.

At 1 p.m. EST on Nov. 24 the eye of dangerous hurricane Otto made landfall on the southern Nicaraguan coast near the town of San Juan De Nicaragu, which is about 70 miles (110 km) south of Bluefields, Nicaragua.

An animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite over the period of Nov. 22 to Nov. 25 showed Hurricane Otto moving through the southwestern Caribbean Sea and make landfall in southern Nicaragua on Nov. 24. The GOES series of satellites are managed by NOAA, and the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses that data to create images and animations.

On Nov. 25 at 7 a.m. EST (1200 UTC) Otto’s center had exited Nicaragua and moved into the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that all warnings and watches have been discontinued.

The center of Tropical Storm Otto was located near latitude 10.5 North and longitude 87.6 West. That puts the center of Otto about 115 miles (190 km) west-southwest of Santa Elena, Costa Rica. Otto was moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kph). NHC expects a westward motion on Saturday, Nov. 26. Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 kph) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours.

An infrared image from NOAA’s GOES-West satellite on Nov. 25 at 8:30 a.m. EST (1330 UTC) showed Tropical Storm Otto in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

For updated forecasts visit the NHC website:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/