Oct 09

MICHAEL MOVING NORTH-NORTHWESTWARD THROUGH THE SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

Hurricane Michael is centered as of 4 a.m. CDT over the southern Gulf of Mexico about 390 miles (630 km) south of Apalachicola. On the forecast track, the center will continue to move over the southern Gulf of Mexico this morning, then move across the eastern Gulf of Mexico later today and tonight, move inland over the Florida Panhandle or Florida Big Bend area on Wednesday, and then move northeastward across the southeastern United States Wednesday night and Thursday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (150 km/h) with higher gusts. Strengthening is expected, and Michael is forecast to be a major hurricane at landfall in Florida. Weakening is expected after landfall as Michael moves through the southeastern United States.

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from the Okaloosa County Line Florida to Anclote River Florida. A Storm Surge Watch is in effect from the Anclote River to Anna Maria Island Florida, including Tampa Bay, and from the Alabama/Florida border to Okaloosa/Walton County Line, Florida. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from the Alabama/Florida border to Suwannee River Florida. A Hurricane Watch is in effect from the Alabama/Florida border to the Mississippi/Alabama border. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from the Alabama/Florida border to the Mississippi/Alabama border; from the Suwanee River to Chassahowitzka Florida, and for the Cuban province of Pinar del Rio. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from Chassahowitzka to Anna Maria Island Florida, including Tampa Bay; the Mississippi/Alabama border to the Mouth of the Pearl River, and from Fernandina Beach, Florida, to South Santee River, South Carolina. Interests elsewhere across the southeastern United States should monitor the progress of Michael.

For storm information specific to your area in the United States, including possible inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service forecast office www.weather.gov For storm information specific to your area outside the United States, please monitor products issued by your national meteorological service.

An intermediate advisory will be issued by NHC at 7 a.m. CDT and a complete advisory at 10 a.m. CDT – www.hurricanes.gov

Oct 28

TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS ISSUED FOR WESTERN CUBA AND THE NORTHWESTERN BAHAMAS

NHC has begun issuing advisories on Potential Tropical Cyclone Eighteen. It’s located over the Northwest Caribbean Sea about 305 miles (490 km) south-southwest of the Isle of Youth and about 415 miles (670 km) south-southwest of Havana, Cuba.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Isla de la Juventud, La Habana, Ciudad de la Habana, Matanzas, Cienfuegos, and Villa Clara, and the Northwestern Bahamas. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the Central Bahamas. Tropical storm conditions are expected to first reach the warning area in Cuba Saturday and the northwestern Bahamas Saturday night. Interests in the Cayman Islands, South Florida, and the Florida Keys should monitor the progress of this system.

On the forecast track, the system will move across western Cuba late Saturday and move through then northwestern Bahamas Saturday night and early Sunday. Data from an Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts. However, the system does not yet have a well-defined center. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 24 to 36 hours. Environmental conditions are expected to be conducive for development, and the system is likely to become a tropical storm tonight or Saturday. When that occurs, it will be given the name “Philippe”.

The system has the potential to produce the following rainfall totals:
– Northern Honduras: Additional 1 to 3 inches tonight.
– Cayman Islands, western and central Cuba and the Northwest
Bahamas: 4 to 8 inches with maximum totals of 10 inches.
These rainfall amounts may produce life threatening flash floods and mudslides.
– South Florida, including the Florida Keys: 3 to 5 inches, with isolated maximum of 8 inches possible. These rainfall totals may produce flash flooding, especially in urbanized areas.

Nov 25

ATLANTIC OCEAN * Full Update* NASA Sees Hurricane Otto’s Landfall and Exit from Nicaragua

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Hurricane Otto made landfall in southern Nicaragua on Thursday, Nov. 24 with maximum sustained winds near 110 mph (175 kph) as a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. A NASA animation of NOAA’s GOES satellite imagery captured the movement and landfall of this late-season storm.

At 1 p.m. EST on Nov. 24 the eye of dangerous hurricane Otto made landfall on the southern Nicaraguan coast near the town of San Juan De Nicaragu, which is about 70 miles (110 km) south of Bluefields, Nicaragua.

An animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite over the period of Nov. 22 to Nov. 25 showed Hurricane Otto moving through the southwestern Caribbean Sea and make landfall in southern Nicaragua on Nov. 24. The GOES series of satellites are managed by NOAA, and the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses that data to create images and animations.

On Nov. 25 at 7 a.m. EST (1200 UTC) Otto’s center had exited Nicaragua and moved into the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that all warnings and watches have been discontinued.

The center of Tropical Storm Otto was located near latitude 10.5 North and longitude 87.6 West. That puts the center of Otto about 115 miles (190 km) west-southwest of Santa Elena, Costa Rica. Otto was moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kph). NHC expects a westward motion on Saturday, Nov. 26. Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 kph) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours.

An infrared image from NOAA’s GOES-West satellite on Nov. 25 at 8:30 a.m. EST (1330 UTC) showed Tropical Storm Otto in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

For updated forecasts visit the NHC website:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

Nov 22

Tropical Storm Otto kills four in Panama

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At least four people have died in Panama in severe weather caused by the approach of Tropical Storm Otto, officials say. Two victims died in a mudslide, a girl drowned in a river and a boy died when a tree fell on the car taking him to school. His mother, driving, survived.

The Panamanian education minister has suspended classes until Thursday.

Tropical Storm Otto is stationary as of late Tuesday morning, centered about 330 miles (530 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua. A westward drift is expected to begin later today, followed by a faster westward motion on Wednesday. On the forecast track, Otto should be approaching the coasts of Nicaragua and Costa Rica on Thursday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph (110 km/h) with higher gusts. Otto is expected to become a hurricane later today or tonight, with additional strengthening forecast through Thursday.

A Hurricane Watch is in effect from the Costa Rica/Panama border to south of Bluefields, aTropical Storm Warning is in effect from Nargana to Colon, a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for San Andresa and from west of Colon to the Costa Rica/Panama border.

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Tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area today and tonight. Tropical storm conditions are possible within the tropical storm watch area on Wednesday or Wednesday night. Hurricane conditions are possible within the hurricane watch area on Thursday.

Outer rain bands from Otto are expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 3 to 6 inches over San Andres and Providencia islands, and the higher terrain of central and western Panama and southern Costa Rica through Wednesday. Total rainfall of 6 to 12 inches, with isolated amounts of 15 to 20 inches, can be expected across northern Costa Rica and southern Nicaragua through Thursday.

Get the latest on Otto by going directly to the NHC website at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/#OTTO