Oct 12

Typhoon Hagibis makes landfall in Shizuoka

Officials at Japan’s Meteorological Agency say Typhoon Hagibis made landfall near Izu Peninsula in Shizuoka Prefecture just before 7 p.m. Saturday.

Hagibis is classified as “strong” and is bringing heavy rain and winds to wide areas of central and eastern Japan.

Officials at Japan’s Meteorological Agency have extended an heavy rain emergency warning to the prefectures of Ibaraki, Tochigi, Niigata, Fukushima and Miyagi at 7:50 p.m.

It is the highest level on the agency’s five-tier warning scale.

The agency had already issued the same warning to Tokyo and the central and eastern prefectures of Shizuoka, Kanagawa, Saitama, Gunma, Yamanashi and Nagano earlier on Saturday.

These areas are experiencing severe rainfall that is only expected once every several decades and there is an imminent danger of landslides and flooding. People are being urged to do everything they can to protect themselves.

<Analysis at 10 UTC, 12 October>
Scale Large
Intensity
Center position N34°55′ (34.9°)
E138°55′ (138.9°)
Direction and speed of movement NNE 35 km/h (20 kt)
Central pressure 955 hPa
Maximum wind speed near center 40 m/s (80 kt)
Maximum wind gust speed 60 m/s (115 kt)
≥ 50 kt wind area SE 330 km (180 NM)
NW 260 km (140 NM)
≥ 30 kt wind area E 650 km (350 NM)
W 560 km (300 NM)
<Forecast for 21 UTC, 12 October>
Intensity
Center position of probability circle N38°35′ (38.6°)
E143°10′ (143.2°)
Direction and speed of movement NE 50 km/h (27 kt)
Central pressure 975 hPa
Maximum sustained wind speed 35 m/s (65 kt)
Maximum wind gust speed 50 m/s (95 kt)
Radius of probability circle 60 km (30 NM)
Storm warning area ALL 390 km (210 NM)
<Forecast for 09 UTC, 13 October>
Intensity
LOW
Center position of probability circle N42°50′ (42.8°)
E152°40′ (152.7°)
Direction and speed of movement ENE 80 km/h (42 kt)
Central pressure 986 hPa
Maximum sustained wind speed 30 m/s (55 kt)
Maximum wind gust speed 40 m/s (80 kt)
Radius of probability circle 90 km (50 NM)
Storm warning area ALL 350 km (190 NM)
Nov 03

NASA Sees Damrey Strengthen into a Typhoon

Image: The AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured temperature data of Typhoon Damrey’s clouds on Nov. 2 at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT). Coldest cloud tops (purple) were as cold as or colder than -63F (-53C). (Credits: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen)

NASA’s Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided imagery of Damrey as it strengthened into a typhoon in the South China Sea.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured temperature data of Typhoon Damrey’s clouds on Nov. 2 at 1811 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT). AIRS found that coldest cloud tops were as cold as or colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit or minus 53 degrees Celsius which are indicative of strong storms. NASA research has shown that storms with cloud tops that cold have the capability to generate heavy rainfall.

On Nov 3, 2017 at 1:06 a.m. EDT (0506 UTC) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Damrey approaching Vietnam. The image revealed spiral bands of thunderstorms surrounding the low-level center and the hint of an eye.

Damrey is in a favorable area for strengthening with low vertical wind shear and is tracking through and area of warm sea surface temperatures.