Sep 11

JOSE PASSING WELL NORTHEAST OF THE TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

Hurricane Jose is centered at 11 a.m. AST about 305 miles (490 km) north-northeast of Grand Turk Island. Jose is moving toward the north near 9 mph (15 km/h). A turn toward the northeast is expected tonight, followed by a slower motion toward the southeast Tuesday and Tuesday night. Maximum sustained winds are near 105 mph (165 km/h) with higher gusts. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km). The estimated minimum central pressure is 968 mb (28.59 inches).

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect. Swells generated by Jose will affect portions of Hispaniola, the Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands over the next couple of days. These swells are likely to produce high surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office – www.weather.gov

Aug 02

The hottest July for at least the last 30 years in Cyprus

July 2017: the hottest July for at least the last 30 years

In July 2017 extremely high temperatures were recorded all over Cyprus. Specifically, the mean provisional daily maximum temperatures of Athalassa, Prodromos, Pafos Airport, Larnaka Airport and Paralimni are a record of high temperatures of July and rank July 2017 as the hottest for at least the last 30 years.

The table of “Ranking of Mean Daily Maximum Temperature for July” and the chart of Mean Daily Maximum, Minimum and Mean Temperature for the station of Athalassa for the period 1983-2017, are presented below.

Ranking of Mean Daily Maximum Temperature
Polis Chrysochous
Pafos A/P
Prodromos
Troodos
Lemesos
Athalassa R/S
Larnaka A/PParalimni
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean Daily
Year
Mean DailyYearMean Daily
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp
Max Temp Max Temp
1
2016
35.4
2017
32.2
2017
31.3
2000
28.4
2012
35.2
2017
39.3
2017
34.6201736.5
2
1998
34.6
2012
31.8
2000
31.2
2017
28.2
2007
35.1
2000
39.1
2012
34.2201235.8
3
1968
34.5
2007
31.6
2001
30.1
2001
26.8
2011
34.6
2012
38.2
2000
34.1200835.3
4
1977
34.4
2016
31.5
2008
29.6
1998
26.6
2017
34.6
1998
38.2
2003
34.0201335.3
5
1988
34.3
1988
31.4
2011
29.6
1996
26.6
2000
34.5
2008
38.2
1978
33.9201635.3
6
2008
34.3
2002
31.2
2007
29.2
2007
26.6
1988
34.4
2007
38.2
2007
33.8201135.1
7
2007
34.2
2008
31.0
1980
29.1
2012
26.3
2015
34.2
1988
38.1
1988
33.8200035.0
8
1995
34.1
2000
30.9
2016
29.1
1980
26.3
2002
34.2
2016
38.0
2009
33.7200234.8
9
2017
34.1
2009
30.9
1996
29.0
2011
26.2
2004
34.1
2004
38.0
2004
33.6200734.8
10
1978
34.1
2011
30.8
2004
29.0
2004
26.1
2016
34.1
2003
37.7
2016
33.6200334.4
Mar 27

Coral Sea Tropical Cyclone likely to develop this weekend

PHOTO: Cyclone Debbie is expected to impact areas from Cardwell to St Lawrence. (Bureau of Meteorology)

North Queensland remains on high alert with the tropical low in the Coral Sea likely to intensify to tropical cyclone strength this weekend.

The next name on the cyclone list is #CycloneDebbie.

Bureau of Meteorology Queensland Regional Director, Bruce Gunn, said the low was located approximately 600km northeast of Cairns and Townsville, and likely reach cyclone strength as early as Saturday.

“Communities between Cape Tribulation and Proserpine are urged to prepare now for a potential crossing anytime between late Sunday and early Tuesday, but the most likely scenario is for the cyclone to make landfall between Cairns and Townsville on Monday,” said Mr Gunn.

“There is always a degree of uncertainty in forecasting cyclones, for this reason we urge the public to stay tuned for the latest official warnings from the Bureau of Meteorology and follow the advice of local emergency services.

“The intensity of the cyclone will hinge on how much time the system spends over the water. If the cyclone speeds up, it is likely remain at the lower end of the spectrum, but if it crosses on Monday or Tuesday there is the potential for it to intensify to severe tropical cyclone strength, Category 3 or higher.”

Heavy rains are likely to continue well into next week for northern and central Queensland. A Flood Watch has also been issued today for coastal catchments between Cooktown to Mackay extending inland to the eastern Gulf Rivers.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services are urging the public to review their emergency kits and discuss their emergency plans with their household and family.

Exercise caution and avoid travel when warnings are in place. Never walk, ride or drive through floodwaters.

There have been three tropical cyclones already this season, Yvette in December, Alfred in February, Blanche in March. Cyclone Caleb formed in the Indian Ocean near the Cocos Islands yesterday (23 March 2017).

The last cyclone to cross the Queensland coast was Tropical Cyclone Nathan, which crossed near Cape Flattery, north of Cooktown (20 March, 2015) as a Category 4 system.

The Bureau’s Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Brisbane operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with forecasters monitoring the situation and providing the latest information for emergency services, media and the community.

Feb 22

Heat Wave Breaks Records in Australia

NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using data from the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC). Caption by Adam Voiland.

Heat waves are not unusual in Australia. A subtropical belt of high pressure that flows over the continent regularly delivers pulses of hot, dry air to the surface in the summer. Yet even by Australian standards, the intense heat wave of February 2017 has been remarkable.

When a high-pressure system stalled over central Australia, extreme temperatures emerged first in South Australia and Victoria and then spread to New South Wales, Queensland, and Northern Territory. With overheated bats dropping from trees and bushfires burning out of control, temperatures smashed records in many areas.

This map shows peak land surface temperatures between February 7 and 14, 2017, a period when some of the most extreme heating occurred. The map is based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. Note that it depicts land surface temperatures, not air temperatures. Land surface temperatures reflect how hot the surface of the Earth would feel to the touch in a particular location. They can sometimes be significantly hotter or cooler than air temperatures. (To learn more about LSTs and air temperatures, read: Where is the Hottest Place on Earth?)

On February 12, 2017, air temperatures rose to 46.6°C (115.9°F) in the coastal city of Port Macquarie, New South Wales, breaking the city’s all-time record by 3.3 degrees Celsius (5.9 degrees Fahrenheit). Two days earlier, the average maximum temperature across all of New South Wales hit a record-setting 42.4°C (108.3°F)—a record that was broken the next day when it rose to 44.0°C (111.2°F).

In some places, the duration of the heatwave has been noteworthy. Mungindi, a town on the border of Queensland and New South Wales, endured 52 days in a row when maximum temperatures exceeded 35°C (95°F)—a record for New South Wales.

Many scientists see exceptional heat waves like this as part of a broader trend. For instance, one study published by the Climate Council of Australia concluded that heatwaves—defined as at least three days of unusually high temperatures—grew significantly longer, more intense, and frequent between 1971 and 2008.

Feb 20

Tropical Cyclone Alfred remains slow moving along the Gulf of Carpentaria coast

The tropical low in the Gulf of Carpentaria intensified to Category 1 strength this morning. Cyclone Alfred is forecast to move slowly south-southeast, and weaken into a tropical low again tomorrow (Tuesday).

Gales with gusts to 110km/h are occurring at Centre Island, and expected to affect coastal and island communities between Port McArthur and Mornington Island later today as the cyclone edges closer to the coast.

Heavy rain which may lead to flooding is occurring over the eastern Carpentaria District (NT) and Gulf Country District (Qld). Showers and thunderstorms with isolated heavy falls are possible over areas further inland.

Abnormally high tides are expected for the southern Gulf of Carpentaria coast over the next few days, but are not likely to exceed the highest tide of the year. Large waves may produce minor flooding along low-lying coastal areas.

Flood Watches have been issued for the Queensland Gulf Rivers and Northern Territory Carpentaria Coastal Rivers.

Catchments at risk include Queensland’s Nicholson, Leichhardt, Flinders, Norman and Gilbert rivers and the Northern Territory’s Roper and McArthur River systems.

Many catchments of the Carpentaria Coastal Rivers are saturated from monsoonal conditions over the past two weeks and are responding strongly to further rainfall. Road conditions have been affected in many areas and some roads remain impassable. Some communities may remain isolated until conditions improve.

Nov 25

ATLANTIC OCEAN * Full Update* NASA Sees Hurricane Otto’s Landfall and Exit from Nicaragua

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Hurricane Otto made landfall in southern Nicaragua on Thursday, Nov. 24 with maximum sustained winds near 110 mph (175 kph) as a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. A NASA animation of NOAA’s GOES satellite imagery captured the movement and landfall of this late-season storm.

At 1 p.m. EST on Nov. 24 the eye of dangerous hurricane Otto made landfall on the southern Nicaraguan coast near the town of San Juan De Nicaragu, which is about 70 miles (110 km) south of Bluefields, Nicaragua.

An animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite over the period of Nov. 22 to Nov. 25 showed Hurricane Otto moving through the southwestern Caribbean Sea and make landfall in southern Nicaragua on Nov. 24. The GOES series of satellites are managed by NOAA, and the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses that data to create images and animations.

On Nov. 25 at 7 a.m. EST (1200 UTC) Otto’s center had exited Nicaragua and moved into the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that all warnings and watches have been discontinued.

The center of Tropical Storm Otto was located near latitude 10.5 North and longitude 87.6 West. That puts the center of Otto about 115 miles (190 km) west-southwest of Santa Elena, Costa Rica. Otto was moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kph). NHC expects a westward motion on Saturday, Nov. 26. Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 kph) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours.

An infrared image from NOAA’s GOES-West satellite on Nov. 25 at 8:30 a.m. EST (1330 UTC) showed Tropical Storm Otto in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

For updated forecasts visit the NHC website:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

Nov 22

Tropical Storm Otto kills four in Panama

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At least four people have died in Panama in severe weather caused by the approach of Tropical Storm Otto, officials say. Two victims died in a mudslide, a girl drowned in a river and a boy died when a tree fell on the car taking him to school. His mother, driving, survived.

The Panamanian education minister has suspended classes until Thursday.

Tropical Storm Otto is stationary as of late Tuesday morning, centered about 330 miles (530 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua. A westward drift is expected to begin later today, followed by a faster westward motion on Wednesday. On the forecast track, Otto should be approaching the coasts of Nicaragua and Costa Rica on Thursday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph (110 km/h) with higher gusts. Otto is expected to become a hurricane later today or tonight, with additional strengthening forecast through Thursday.

A Hurricane Watch is in effect from the Costa Rica/Panama border to south of Bluefields, aTropical Storm Warning is in effect from Nargana to Colon, a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for San Andresa and from west of Colon to the Costa Rica/Panama border.

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Tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area today and tonight. Tropical storm conditions are possible within the tropical storm watch area on Wednesday or Wednesday night. Hurricane conditions are possible within the hurricane watch area on Thursday.

Outer rain bands from Otto are expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 3 to 6 inches over San Andres and Providencia islands, and the higher terrain of central and western Panama and southern Costa Rica through Wednesday. Total rainfall of 6 to 12 inches, with isolated amounts of 15 to 20 inches, can be expected across northern Costa Rica and southern Nicaragua through Thursday.

Get the latest on Otto by going directly to the NHC website at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/#OTTO

Oct 31

2016: Another low year for declining Arctic sea ice -Met Office

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Arctic sea ice extent for September 2016 was 4.72 million square kilometers (1.82 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that month. The black cross indicates the geographic North Pole. Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center

Measurements of the extent of summer Arctic sea ice reveal that 2016 has been the joint second lowest year on record.

Every September sea ice in the Arctic reaches a minimum extent after retreating during the northern hemisphere summer. This September the latest figures reveal that the minimum extent is short of an absolute record, but adds to the series that the last 10 years have witnessed the lowest extent of summer sea ice in the Arctic ever recorded.

The extent of summer Arctic sea ice has decreased by over 13% per decade since satellite records began in 1979, relative to the 1981-2010 average of 6.38 million square km.

This year’s figure of 4.14 million square km, released by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) is the joint-second lowest on record since satellite monitoring began in 1979, virtually identical to the 4.15 million square km recorded in 2007. The lowest extent of summer Arctic sea ice, since 1979, was recorded in 2012, with a figure of 3.39 million square km.

Dr Ed Blockley leads the Met Office Polar Climate Group. Commenting on today’s figures he said: “It is highly noteworthy that the 10 years with the lowest extent of Arctic sea ice have all been within the last 10 years. Despite a record low winter ice extent in March, this year’s figure isn’t an absolute record. But this shouldn’t detract from the fact there has been a substantial decline in the extent of Arctic sea ice over the last few decades.

“The current rate of loss of Arctic summer sea ice of 13% per decade is equivalent to an annual loss greater than the size of Scotland.”

Sea ice is an important component of the climate system because it regulates the transfer of heat and energy between the atmosphere and the ocean.

Ed Blockley added: “Being whiter than the sea surface, particularly so when covered by snow, sea ice reflects more of the Sun’s rays back into space than does the surrounding ocean. It therefore plays a key role in regulating the amount of the Sun’s energy absorbed by the Earth.

“There is actually a positive feedback system: less ice means more of the Sun’s energy is absorbed which in turn further reduces the extent of ice through melting.”

Oct 11

Tropical Cyclone season to be more active for NW Australia

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Northwest Australia can expect the tropical cyclone season to be more active than last season according to the Bureau of Meteorology Tropical Cyclone Seasonal Outlook released today.

Acting Regional Director for Western Australia, Mr Grahame Reader, said it is important that residents are not complacent ahead of the start of the season on 1 November.

“Over the past 5 years the number of significant cyclone and flood impacts has been well below average, and the 2015-16 season was a very quiet one, with only Tropical Cyclone Stan impacting the WA coast at the end of January 2016.” he said.

According to the outlook released today, Mr Reader said that climate models are indicating an average to above average number of tropical cyclones this season, but he cautioned that the number of tropical cyclones is not a good indicator of the threat to communities.

“If just one cyclone impacts a community with destructive winds or flooding, then that will be a bad season for that community”. The tropical cyclone seasons runs from 1 November to 30 April.

Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) Country Assistant Commissioner Graham Swift is urging people in the northwest to be ready, even if they think they’re not at risk.

“Just because you haven’t been impacted by a devastating cyclone previously, doesn’t mean it couldn’t happen to you this year – all it takes is one cyclone to change your life” Assistant Commissioner Swift said.

Communities in the State’s north remain at serious risk of the devastation of cyclones and need to prepare now to keep their homes and loved ones safe.

Keeping safe is as simple as securing outdoor items like boats or trailers, preparing an emergency kit and taking heed of the community warnings.

Summary of the Tropical Cyclone Seasonal Outlook for Western Australia:

  • A 63% chance of an above average number of tropical cyclones in waters off the northwest coast (average number is five).
  • Likelihood of around two coastal impacts.
  • Significant risk of at least one severe tropical cyclone coastal impact during the season.

More information:

Aug 17

BBC Weather Contract Awarded to MeteoGroup

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Richard Sadler, Chairman of the Board, MeteoGroup

The BBC has awarded the contract for the provision of its weather services to MeteoGroup from Spring 2017 following a regulated procurement process. MeteoGroup believes it will be a close cultural fit and natural partner of the BBC, sharing its values and vision for the provision of weather data and graphics.

MeteoGroup will provide the highest quality forecasting and state-of-the art graphics solutions for weather services on all BBC platforms, TV, radio, web and mobile, worldwide.

MeteoGroup is a world-leading commercial weather company, headquartered in the UK it has offices in 16 countries employing 450 staff. Quality is at the heart of all its operations and the success of the company internationally has been based on its ability to deliver demonstrably better weather forecasts and solutions.

Founded in 1986, MeteoGroup has thirty years’ experience of delivering weather solutions to the media and other weather-critical markets worldwide. Here in the UK, MeteoGroup has more customers than any other commercial weather company, including national broadcasters, regional and national press, energy, offshore and shipping companies. The majority of the UK’s roads network also rely on MeteoGroups’ winter forecast services.

Richard Sadler, MeteoGroup Chairman commented “MeteoGroup is honoured to have been chosen to partner with the worlds’ leading broadcaster. The BBC is dedicated to offering the best possible weather service to its’ audience and it has been a demanding selection process. I am delighted that MeteoGroup has emerged from this process as the successful bidder based on rigorous award criteria, including our forecasting and the quality of our visuals.”

Visit the BBC blog here.

About MeteoGroup:

MeteoGroup is one of the world’s leading full-service B2B weather solutions businesses, operating across all sectors where weather impacts decision making. We provide innovative tools and support which assist our customers to communicate weather to the public or to make critical business decisions creating value, saving costs, minimising risk and managing environmental impact. Our team of expert and experienced meteorologists is available 24/7 to deliver the highest quality analysis and advice. With over 450 employees operating in 16 countries across the world, MeteoGroup provides local services to a global audience.

In addition to the weather solutions we provide to corporate, industrial and media customers, MeteoGroup is also the company behind the best-selling mobile apps WeatherPro and MeteoEarth and numerous weather websites.

MeteoGroup is backed by General Atlantic, one of the largest private investments firms in the world whose focus is building industry leaders in high growth sectors.